Listen to the Stars

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Stars Over Acadia Ipad 4 Wallpaper

 

Hello Inksters!

Just in case you didn’t hear, scientists last week confirmed that gravitational waves exist. They even recorded the sound of two black holes colliding! Listen here: Gravitational Waves

And learn more here: National Geographic

And here: The Guardian

Coincidentally, today’s guest inkspiration — a poem by Logan, age 11 — imagines the possibility of hearing the stars. What a surprise in that line — the idea of hearing something people normally spend time gazing, or looking, at. After reading the poem, we think about nighttime and the stars in a new way.

Here is Logan reading the poem:

Logan reading “Nighttime”

And here is the text of her poem:

Nighttime 
 
It’s hard to listen in the daytime 
the sounds are jumbled- blended together 
If you hear a special sound, you have to hold it quick- 
in a second 
it’s gone 
Daytime sounds disappear 
disintegrate 
desolve 
into night.
The loud 
blends smoothly into the quiet after the sun goes down. 
At night, 
the air is cool,  
the sounds are sharper 
and the only human things are the cars that sometimes rush by way past eleven. 
At nighttime 
You’re open to the sounds of the animals 
owls 
foxes 
mice 
It’s easier to ​be​ at night. 
Like all your senses are in high definition 
Listen closely- 
You might just hear the stars. 
 Now it’s your turn! Open your Writer’s Notebook and write about one of the following:
  • Spend time with this poem. Write down words you enjoy from the poem, phrases you like, questions you have about the poem.
  • Show us what you see! Draw a picture to illustrate, or go along with, a part of the poem.
  • Write your own poem about a time of day. Logan writes about nighttime. What would your poem about nighttime be? What about the early morning? Or midday? Lunchtime or play time? Try to include a line in your poem that is surprising to your reader and that allows the reader to imagine something in a different way.

Drawn to the science? Write in your journals, too, about what you learned from the videos. What questions do you have about this discovery? What do you wonder about?

A big Inktopia Thank You to Logan for sharing her work with us!

Remember to share your creations and questions here by responding to the post.

Have an idea for an inkspiration? Send it to inktopiakids@gmail.com.

 

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